GANA Member Gallery

Works by GANA Members

Richard Homer

Richard Homer

Richard considers his most noteworthy skill his creativity in new design, which often requires new cutting techniques and procedures, that in turn require specialized tools he creates to suit his needs. In fact, Richard specifically allocates eight hours a week to engage his mind in creative tooling and its applications to new gem designs, allowing him to stay on the cutting edge of lapidary art. Out of this penchant for experimentation, Richard became one of the original pioneers of the unique American lapidary art form which became known as concave faceting. He brought the first concave faceted gem art to the attention of the jewelry industry at the 1990 AGTA gem show in Tucson.”

He enjoys working with a range of gems from Amblygonite to Zoisite, each one of which he knows inside and out, allowing him to recognize a good piece of rough and how to get the best out of it. “He can make average material beautiful and rare or wonderful material downright stunning”, asserts David Zoltan of David Zoltan Designs in Austin, Texas. A belief validated by Richard’s having won a total of 27 Cutting Edge, Gemmys, and Spectrum Awards as well as having collaboratively won Best of Show in the Saul Bell Awards, over 100 regional and national JA awards, and most recently a finished piece acquired by The Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.

He has also set records cutting one of the world’s largest gemstones; the 20,769ct Adiël Topaz and some of the rarest, including Tashmarine, Kyanite, and Paraiba Tourmaline.

 

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Joy Houghton

Joy Houghton

Joy Houghton discovered gem carving during a childhood pearl diving expedition. She and her brother lowered wild rice reeds between lily pads to spear the open spouts of clams, hoping the clams would slam shut. When she pushed the first stem into the water, light refraction bent the reed’s image at an oblique angle. That was her first carving lesson.

 

Joy attended the Layton School of Art while still in high school. She graduated from the  University of Wisconsin, was accepted into the MFA program at the University of Minnesota, and left before her final show to pursue other graduate work and employment.

 

Years later, Joy became interested in the stones she found on the beach, first collecting, then cutting them. Within months se was buying and carving ametrine, garnet, and citrine. Fascination then became profession. Now, it’s play, again.

Joy’s work has appeared in trade publications such as JCK Magazine and Jewelry Artist as well as Lightgraphie, LLC’s Opal, The Phenomenal Gemstone.

 

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Keith Irvin Appleman

Keith Irvin Appleman

Keith is both a carver and a faceter. He is a member of both Gem Artists of North America and Columbia Williamette Faceters Guild in Portland, Oregon.

Although he does some faceting, he prefers to work with his lighted Quartz extrusions. These multimedia projects allow him to also use his woodworking skills to put together some unique and useful objects d’ art. His work can best be appreciated as a focal point in a dark area or room.

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Maile Ellington

Maile Ellington

“I dreamt I was a carver of stones, Then I woke up and realized the whole time they had been shaping me.” – Maile

In 1993, I held an ancient strand of neolithic stone beads in my hand. In that moment, the shape of my world changed forever. I felt a full body awakening, a remembrance. A calling from the seed of all I’ve ever been, across centuries and continents. A call to bridge the worlds of man and mineral.

When I sat to carve my first stone, I remembered its past, directly experienced its present, and I knew beyond knowing that this was my future.

Since that day, I have spent 20 years listening to the stones, carving them for people all over the world who seek their guidance and outrageous beauty. I serve as a conduit, cultivating a global circle of humanity, with shared vision and heart. A tribe, who treasures nature’s gifts, and through their stones, treasures each other.

 

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Nicolai Medvedev

Nicolai Medvedev

Nicolai is a master of intarsia, a labor-intensive form of lapidary art that flourished in western Europe during the 18th century. An interest in Middle Asian jewelry, with its inlays and gemstone overlays, and the Faberge-style craftsmanship he discovered at the Hermitage in St. Petersburg led Medvedev to intarsia. Since immigrating to the United States in 1980, he has focused entirely on intarsia, developing his own approach and techniques, and is now widely considered to be one of the world’s premier intarsia artists.

Medvedev began reviving this intricate method of mosaic over two decades ago using modern technology and the finest gem materials. Whether creating delicate pendants or magnificent boxes lined with exotic woods, Medvedev demonstrates an unrivaled degree of accuracy and precision in his work which, coupled with a remarkable eye Medvedev began his formal art training at the age of twelve and continued for fourteen years, including several years of impressionist painting at the prestigious Art Institute of Moscow.

Medvedev was born and raised in Ashkhabad, Turkmenia, a Russian city near Iran known for centuries as a source of beautiful jewelry and colorfully patterned carpets. He considers these handicrafts to be the greatest influence on his designs though the culture, architecture, arts, and daily life of the many regions he has visited provide inspiration as well.for color and design, produces breathtaking results.

 

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Michael Christie

Michael Christie

Michael Christie is a self-taught gem artist specializing in unique functional essence bottles that are also jewelry. Known for his fine gem pendants, the pendants have now evolved into Michael’s essence bottles becoming a “Jewel for your Jewels”, layer upon layer of surprises as the bottle unfolds to become earrings and pendant, backs to the earrings hidden in a secret compartment in the base which only hinging back of the main bottle reveal.

A background in race car driving, automotive, and welding, transferred into the unusual mechanics he employs to create his bottles. Most of the elaborate bottles take several months to complete, having up to fifteen stones and sixty individual pieces of gold.

Michael’s wife Susan Allen is responsible for the beautiful internal carvings that enhance Michael’s essence bottles.

Michael Christie’s work has recently been displayed at the Los Angeles Museum of Natural History, the Lizzadro Museum of Lapidary Art, and is presently on display at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History.

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Nancy Arthur McGehee

Nancy Arthur McGehee

Nancy is a classically trained artist for whom both drawing and natural history are passions.  Her body of work as an artist takes form in three mediums: engraved glass and intaglio gems, scientific illustration, and drawing.  The intaglio gems are carved in reverse to capture light and texture.  Wax impressions are made of each intaglio to check the detail and to register the work when it is finished.  Nancy develops designs from her drawing studies, representational designs that reference nature and in which she strives to capture a quality of life or movement.

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Rick Olmstead

Rick Olmstead

Rick prefers not to specialize in any single aspect of the Lapidary Arts, but to explore the entire field.

As the son of a professional photographer and having a visually oriented psyche, the wondrous patterns and colors of agates and other rocks fascinated him from a very young age. That fascination nearly brought him to pursue a degree in Geology, but an interest in the field of metalwork took precedence and he graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Education.

This strong interest and background in stones and metalworking together later proved to be the perfect combination for a future in the Lapidary and Jewelry Arts.  He now makes his entire living in the jewelry field and although he continues to cut stones for their own sake, most of them end up in his own finished jewelry.

 

 

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Susan Allen

Susan Allen

Allen’s mastery of microscopic detail and the power of imagination is unrivaled making her one of the most widely collected internal carvers in the world.

Allen is entirely self-taught in the art of gem carving. For many years, she satiated her desire to create as a professional painter but when she discovered internal carving in the mid-1980’s she knew she had found the perfect medium for the fantasy worlds she was exploring on canvas.

Inspired by internal carver Christian Yeagan, she began to experiment with the art of tunneling and reverse stone carving.

 

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Deborah Wilson

Deborah Wilson

An introduction to stone carving at the Vancouver School of Art (now the Emily Carr University of Art & Design) led to exploring form and technique with marble, alabaster and soapstone.

In 1973, an opportunity to carve jade came along while completing the final year majoring in sculpture. This has lead to a lifelong fascination with the Stone of Heaven, working in monumental proportions to small scale wearable pieces. Teaching jade carving to enthusiasts from all over the world has been ongoing since 1993 in Vernon B.C.

International Contemporary Jade Exhibitions have been the focus for the smaller works in exotic jades, both nephrite and jadeite since 2003.

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